Floor insulation with carpet

Floor insulation with carpet

Carpet has excellent floor insulation properties. If your feet are warm, the rest of you will be warm, too.

Due to the insulating effect of carpet, less heat is lost through the floor compared with hard flooring. This means you can turn the central heating thermostat down by a  few notches. That is not only good for your wallet, but for the environment, too. With a carpeted floor, you can save 4 to 5% on your heating costs, and in harsh winters up to 10%! In this way carpet will pay for itself twice over.

Why carpeted rooms need less heating

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Why carpeted rooms need less heating

Leading ergonomics experts and engineers have discovered that in order to feel comfortable, the difference in temperature between your head and feet should not exceed 2.5 °C. This heat difference almost never occurs with a quality wall-to-wall carpet, because of its excellent thermal insulation properties. As carpet removes cold at the level of your feet and ankles, you would even feel more comfortable in a carpeted room where the temperature is one or two degrees lower than in a room with a hard floor.

Source: Prof. Dr. Ing. Lothar Siebel, Sachverständiger für Bauphysik, FH Aachen

The science of carpet insulation

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The science of carpet insulation

Ever wondered why the insulating effect of carpet is ten times higher than that of hard floors? The explanation is simple: physics teaches us that air is a poor conductor of heat and therefore a good insulator. That’s exactly why there is air between the two panels of glass in double glazing. The same logic goes for carpet: between the carpet fibres there is a layer of trapped air that acts as an insulator. Of course, the extent of this depends on the fibres and pile depth. The thicker the carpet, the better its insulating effect. Carpet with underlay delivers even better results.

reduced heat dissipation 

This illustration shows that carpet reduces the heat flow through the floor by acting as an insulator (Source: Dr. Lothar Siebel, Sachverständiger für Bauphysik, Aachen)

reduced heat dissipation comparison

(Source: GUT Gemeinschaft umweltfreundlicher Teppichboden e.V)